Well this made my week: A little over a year ago me and Sitora sat at a table in a little Irish cafe out on Long Island that had a small empty drawer. We decided to leave a note in it for anyone else that would sit at the table and decide to open the drawer. I went back there today for the first time and the little drawer is now full of notes. Stories. Drawings. Jokes. Life advice. Some in different languages. The waitress told me it’s known as the “note desk” and people ask to sit at it when they come in.  (at Swing the Teapot)

Well this made my week: A little over a year ago me and Sitora sat at a table in a little Irish cafe out on Long Island that had a small empty drawer. We decided to leave a note in it for anyone else that would sit at the table and decide to open the drawer. I went back there today for the first time and the little drawer is now full of notes. Stories. Drawings. Jokes. Life advice. Some in different languages. The waitress told me it’s known as the “note desk” and people ask to sit at it when they come in. (at Swing the Teapot)

Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences. (Roy Ascott’s phrase.) That solves a lot of problems: we don’t have to argue whether photographs are art, or whether performances are art, or whether Carl Andre’s bricks or Andrew Serranos’s piss or Little Richard’s ‘Long Tall Sally’ are art, because we say, ‘Art is something that happens, a process, not a quality, and all sorts of things can make it happen.’ … [W]hat makes a work of art ‘good’ for you is not something that is already ‘inside’ it, but something that happens inside you — so the value of the work lies in the degree to which it can help you have the kind of experience that you call art.

Brian Eno (via anieastonbaker)

First Kiss. 20 strangers asked to kiss.